meet / mete / meat

meet / mete / meat
   Meet means "to get together or connect with someone, to encounter": Elroy plans to meet a colleague for lunch.
   Mete means "to distribute": We had to mete out the last of the water when we were still 20 miles from civilization on our hiking trip.
   Meat is flesh that may be eaten: Nathan is a vegetarian who doesn't eat meat at all.

Confused words. 2014.

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  • meet / mete / meat —    Meet means to get together or connect with someone, to encounter : Elroy plans to meet a colleague for lunch.    Mete means to distribute : We had to mete out the last of the water when we were still 20 miles from civilization on our hiking… …   Confused words

  • meet / mete / meat —    Meet means to get together or connect with someone, to encounter : Elroy plans to meet a colleague for lunch.    Mete means to distribute : We had to mete out the last of the water when we were still 20 miles from civilization on our hiking… …   Confused words

  • meat — meet, mete …   American English homophones

  • meet — meat, mete …   American English homophones

  • mete — meat, meet …   American English homophones

  • meat(s) — meet(s) mete(s) …   English homophone dictionary

  • meat — meatless, adj. /meet/, n. 1. the flesh of animals as used for food. 2. the edible part of anything, as a fruit or nut: Crack the walnuts and remove the meats. 3. the essential point or part of an argument, literary work, etc.; gist; crux: The… …   Universalium

  • meat — /mit / (say meet) noun 1. the flesh of animals as used for food. 2. food in general: meat and drink. 3. the edible part of anything, as a fruit, nut, etc. 4. Archaic the principal meal: to say grace before meat. 5. the main substance of something …  

  • measure — [13] The distant ancestor of English measure was the Indo European base *ma , *me ‘measure’. This has generated a wide range of often unexpected English progeny, including meal ‘repast’, month, and moon. Measure itself comes from an extension of… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • measure — [13] The distant ancestor of English measure was the Indo European base *ma , *me ‘measure’. This has generated a wide range of often unexpected English progeny, including meal ‘repast’, month, and moon. Measure itself comes from an extension of… …   Word origins

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